Ethnomusicological works

Joseph Jordania

978-3-659-48841-2-full (1)

Maps and musical examples for book Choral Singing in Human Culture and Evolution 

You can find here 15 maps of distribution of various styles of traditional polyphony in Europe and the world, a map of distribution of stuttering in the world, and also 49 musical examples from various world cultures. These maps and musical examples are complementary to Joseph Jordania’s book “Choral Singing in Human Culture and Evolution” (Lambert Academic Publishers, Saarbrucken, 2015).

This book is the second revised and extended edition of Joseph Jordania’s 2006 book “Who Asked the First Question? Origins of Human Choral Singing, Intelligence, Language and Speech” (Tbilisi State University, Logos, 2006)You can see more detailed information on the audio examples in the book “Choral Singing in Human Culture and Evolution (pages 663-668).

Maps:

01. Distribution of drone-dissonant polyphony in Europe

02. Distribution of variant-heterophony in Europe

03. Distribution of chordal-triadic polyphony in Europe

04. Distribution of melismatic-chordal polyphony in Europe

05. Distribution of melismatic-rubato polyphony in Europe

06. Combined map of distribution of polyphonic styles in Europe

07. Distribution of drone polyphony throughout the world

08. Distribution of ostinato polyphony throughout the world

09. Distribution of parallel polyphony throughout the world

10. Distribution of variant-heterophony throughout the world

11. Distribution of canonic polyphony throughout the world

12. Distribution of chordal-triadic polyphony throughout the world

13. Distribution of free (counterpoint) polyphony throughout the world

14. Combined map of distribution of various types of polyphony throughout the world

15. Distribution of monophony and polyphony throughout the world

16. World map of stuttering prevalence

Audio examples:

01. Central African Pygmy polyphony. Courtesy of Simha Arom and “Rounder”

02. Tanzania, Wagogo tribe. Courtesy of Polo Vallejo and Ocora/Radio France

03. Tanzania, Wagogo tribe. Courtesy of Polo Vallejo and Ocora/Radio France

04. Russian polyphony. Courtesy of Maria Roditeleva

05. Russian polyphony. Courtesy of Maria Roditeleva

06. Tatarstan polyphony. Courtesy of Nailia Almeeva

07. Tatarstan polyphony. Courtesy of Nailia Almeeva

08. Mordvinian polyphony. Courtesy of Nikolai Bojarkin, Jaana-Maria Jukkara and Global Music Centre, Finland

09. Mordvinian polyphony. Courtesy of Nikolai Bojarkin, Jaana-Maria Jukkara and Global Music Centre, Finland

10. Mordvinian polyphony. Courtesy of Nikolai Bojarkin, Jaana-Maria Jukkara and Global Music Centre, Finland

11. Adighian (Circassian) polyphony. Courtesy of Alla Sokolova and Zamudin Guchev

12. Chechen polyphony. Courtesy of Michael Church and Topic Records

13. Ossetian polyphony. Courtesy of Michael Church and Topic Records

14. Georgian polyphony, Svaneti, Courtesy of ensemble “Basiani”

15. Georgian polyphony, women from Racha, courtesy of ensemble “Mzetamze” and Face Music Switzerland

16. Georgian polyphony, Kakheti, Courtesy of ensemble “Basiani”

17. Georgian polyphony, Guria, Courtesy of Anzor Erkomaishvili

18. Georgian polyphony, Achara, Courtesy of ensemble “Basiani”

19. Ukrainian polyphony, Courtesy of Evgeni Efremov

20. Lithuanian polyphony, Courtesy of Daiva Raciunaite

21. Lithuanian polyphony, Courtesy of Daiva Raciunaite

22. Latvian polyphony. Courtesy of Gita Lancere and ensemble “Saucejas”

23. Latvian polyphony. Courtesy of Gita Lancere and ensemble “Saucejas”

24. Bulgarian polyphony. Courtesy of Florian Messner

25. Bosnia-Herzegovina polyphony. Courtesy of Dieter Christensen

26. Albanian polyphony, Courtesy of Michael Church

27. Corsican polyphony. Courtesy of Frédéric Vesperini and ensemble “Spartimu”

28. Corsican polyphony. Courtesy of Frédéric Vesperini and ensemble “Spartimu”

29. Corsican polyphony. Courtesy of Frédéric Vesperini and ensemble “Spartimu”

30. Portugal polyphony. Courtesy of José Alberto Sardinha

31. Portugal polyphony. Courtesy of José Alberto Sardinha

32. Portugal polyphony. Courtesy of José Alberto Sardinha

33. Portugal polyphony. Courtesy of José Alberto Sardinha

34. Portugal polyphony. Courtesy of José Alberto Sardinha

35. Persian Gulf, Bahrain polyphony. Courtesy of Scheherazade Hassan

36. Oman, Bedouin polyphony. Courtesy of Dieter Christensen.

37. Nuristan (Afghanistan) polyphony. Courtesy of the Vienna Phonogram-Archive

38. Nuristan (Afghanistan) polyphony. Courtesy of the Vienna Phonogram-Archive Tuva overtone singing. Courtesy of Theodore Levin

39. Tuva overtone singing. Courtesy of Ted Levin

40. Yakutian heterophony. Courtesy of Eduard Alexeev

41. Ainu (North Japan) polyphony. Courtesy of Kazuyuki Tanimoto

42. Ainu (North Japan) polyphony. Courtesy of Kazuyuki Tanimoto

43. Taiwan polyphony. Courtesy of Lu Yuhsiu and Paul Knight

44. Taiwan polyphony. Courtesy of Lu Yuhsiu and Paul Knight

45. Flores polyphony. Courtesy of Gerald Florian Messner

46. Melanesian polyphony. Courtesy of Gerald Florian Messner

47. Polynesian polyphony. Courtesy of Dieter Christensen, Dr. L. Koch (head of the Berlin Phonogramm-Archiv), and Dr. M. Melk-Koch

48. Vietnam, minority polyphony. Courtesy of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique Musee de la L’Homme

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